My physical CPU is 2.6GHz, with 4 cores. Is it means that my computer has 4 * 2.6GHz = 10.4 GHz ?

asked 2015-05-05 07:17:30 -0500

dmcyrille gravatar image

Thank you very much Sam Yaple. I have another question. Indeed, my physical CPU is 2.6GHz, with 4 cores. Is it means that my computer has 4 * 2.6GHz = 10.4 GHz ? Hope to read you best regards.

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answered 2015-05-06 08:33:08 -0500

See http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/what-doe...

  1. If you have a single-threaded application running on a 3 GHz quad-core CPU, that application will run at 3 GHz — not 12 GHz. It will use one core and the other three cores will sit idle, waiting for other tasks to perform.
  2. More cores help if you’re looking to do more at once or if you have a multithreaded application that can take advantage of them. For example, if you’re running several virtual machines while encoding video, extracting files, and doing other CPU-demanding things on your computer, an octo-core CPU may be able to keep up while even a quad-core CPU may stumble under such load.
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answered 2020-08-08 10:02:16 -0500

I would like to say that read this article- https://www.mrtechsonu.com/quad-core-vs-dual-core-processor/ (what is quad-core and dual-core) to clear your every doubt. But in short, I Can explain to you that 4 core does not mean 4 * clock speed. If this is true then the company would have mentioned because the higher the number, the higher the sales. So that means your statement is not correct

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Asked: 2015-05-05 07:17:30 -0500

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Last updated: May 06 '15