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  1. Just declare git patches after Sources, don't issue %patch(X) -p1 after mentioned directive.
    Via my experience git will apply all patches automatically.
    To make sure run :-

    $ rpmbuild -bb file.spec | tee build.log
    with and without yours patches and compare logs

  2. $ rpm -Vf /../../file.txt
    will return rpm's name installed file.xt

  1. Just declare git patches after Sources, don't issue %patch(X) -p1 after mentioned directive.
    Via my experience git will apply all patches automatically. I silently presume patches themselves are in ../SOURCES
    To make sure run :-

    $ rpmbuild -bb file.spec | tee build.log
    with and without yours patches and compare logs

  2. $ rpm -Vf /../../file.txt
    will return rpm's name installed file.xt

  1. Just declare git patches after Sources, don't issue %patch(X) -p1 after mentioned directive.
    Via my experience git will apply all patches automatically. I silently presume patches themselves are in ../SOURCES
    To make sure run :-

    $ rpmbuild -bb file.spec | tee build.log
    with and without yours patches and compare logs

  2. $ rpm -Vf /../../file.txt
    will return rpm's name installed file.xtfile.txt

  1. Just declare git patches after Sources, don't issue %patch(X) -p1 after mentioned directive.
    Via my experience git will apply all patches automatically. I silently presume patches themselves are in ../SOURCES
    To make sure run :-

    $ rpmbuild -bb file.spec | tee build.log
    with and without yours patches and compare logs

  2. $ rpm -Vf /../../file.txt
    will return rpm's name installed file.txt

If my understanding of "%autosetup -S git" is not correct, I hope RH's package maintainers will help you out.