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You have to extend the respective partition(s) to your needs with tools like fdisk or parted etc. If you run fdisk -l /dev/vda you'll see that you have plenty of space but your partition table does reflect that. To edit the partition table you can use fdisk /dev/vda without the -l.

But before you do anything, please make a backup of your instance so you can roll back. Also make sure you edit the partition table correctly, here's one example of how to do it. You can extend a partition without unmounting it, but you'll have to reboot after the resize2fs command.

Some images are able to recognize the actual disk size and resize their partitions during first boot, but that's not relevant right now. So please be careful what you're doing, and if you're not sure, ask someone to help you. And again: make a backup before changing the partition table!

You have to extend the respective partition(s) to your needs with tools like fdisk or parted etc. If you run fdisk -l /dev/vda you'll see that you have plenty of space but your partition table does not reflect that. To edit the partition table you can use fdisk /dev/vda without the -l.

But before you do anything, please make a backup of your instance so you can roll back. Also make sure you edit the partition table correctly, here's one example of how to do it. You can extend a partition without unmounting it, but you'll have to reboot after the resize2fs command.

Some images are able to recognize the actual disk size and resize their partitions during first boot, but that's not relevant right now. So please be careful what you're doing, and if you're not sure, ask someone to help you. And again: make a backup before changing the partition table!

You have to extend the respective partition(s) to your needs with tools like fdisk or parted etc. If you run fdisk -l /dev/vda you'll see that you have plenty of space but your partition table does not reflect that. To edit the partition table you can use fdisk /dev/vda without the -l.

But before you do anything, please make a backup of your instance so you can roll back. Also make sure you edit the partition table correctly, here's one example of how to do it. You can extend a partition without unmounting it, but you'll have to reboot after the resize2fs command.

Some images are able to recognize the actual disk size and resize their partitions during first boot, but that's not relevant right now. So please be careful what you're doing, and if you're not sure, ask someone to help you. And again: make a backup before changing the partition table!enter code here

You have to extend the respective partition(s) to your needs with tools like fdisk or parted etc. If you run fdisk -l /dev/vda you'll see that you have plenty of space but your partition table does not reflect that. To edit the partition table you can use fdisk /dev/vda without the -l.

But before you do anything, please make a backup of your instance so you can roll back. Also make sure you edit the partition table correctly, here's one example of how to do it. You can extend a partition without unmounting it, but you'll have to reboot after the resize2fs resize2fs command.

Some images are able to recognize the actual disk size and resize their partitions during first boot, but that's not relevant right now. So please be careful what you're doing, and if you're not sure, ask someone to help you. And again: make a backup before changing the partition table!enter code here