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Basically, OpenStack heat and Ansible were created to doing different things, HEAT is developed to detect details related to infrastructure and complete provisioning of that infrastructure on OpenStack.

HEAT provides a way to define compute, storage, network, and other infrastructure related resources. This includes the interrelationships between infrastructure resources, such as associating floating IPs with compute resources or binding a compute resource to a specific network. This assigning key pairs for authentication and naming resources.The result of a heat template is a collection of one or more infrastructure resources based on existing images.The software integrates other components of OpenStack. The templates allow the creation of most OpenStack resource types (such as instances, floating IPs, volumes, security groups, users, etc), as well as some more advanced functionality such as for instance high availability, instance autoscaling, and nested stacks. Heat primarily manages infrastructure, but the templates integrate well with software configuration management tools such as Puppet and Ansible.

Ansible is developed to configuring the infrastructure after provisioning, This includes activities like installing libraries and setting up a specific runtime environment.ansible also supports the provisioning.

so we can use both ansible and heat.....both created for different purposes....

Basically, OpenStack heat and Ansible were created to doing different things, HEAT is developed to detect details related to infrastructure and complete provisioning of that infrastructure on OpenStack.

HEAT provides a way to define compute, storage, network, and other infrastructure related resources. This includes the interrelationships between infrastructure resources, such as associating floating IPs with compute resources or binding a compute resource to a specific network. This assigning key pairs for authentication and naming resources.The result of a heat template is a collection of one or more infrastructure resources based on existing images.The software integrates other components of OpenStack. The templates allow the creation of most OpenStack resource types (such as instances, floating IPs, volumes, security groups, users, etc), as well as some more advanced functionality such as for instance high availability, instance autoscaling, and nested stacks. Heat primarily manages infrastructure, but the templates integrate well with software configuration management tools such as Puppet and Ansible.

Ansible is developed to configuring the infrastructure after provisioning, This includes activities like installing libraries and setting up a specific runtime environment.ansible also supports the provisioning.

so we can use both ansible and heat.....both are created for different purposes....

ref:https://software.danielwatrous.com/heat-or-ansible-in-openstack-both/

https://docs.openstack.org/heat/latest/

Basically, OpenStack heat and Ansible were created to doing different things, HEAT is developed to detect details related to infrastructure and complete provisioning of that infrastructure on OpenStack.

HEAT provides a way to define compute, storage, network, and other infrastructure related resources. This includes the interrelationships between infrastructure resources, such as associating floating IPs with compute resources or binding a compute resource to a specific network. This assigning key pairs for authentication and naming resources.The result of a heat template is a collection of one or more infrastructure resources based on existing images.The software integrates other components of OpenStack. The templates allow the creation of most OpenStack resource types (such as instances, floating IPs, volumes, security groups, users, etc), as well as some more advanced functionality such as for instance high availability, instance autoscaling, and nested stacks. Heat primarily manages infrastructure, but the templates integrate well with software configuration management tools such as Puppet and Ansible.

Ansible is developed to configuring the infrastructure after provisioning, This includes activities like installing libraries and setting up a specific runtime environment.ansible also supports the provisioning.

so we can use both ansible and heat.....both are created for different purposes....

ref:https://software.danielwatrous.com/heat-or-ansible-in-openstack-both/ref: https://software.danielwatrous.com/heat-or-ansible-in-openstack-both/

https://docs.openstack.org/heat/latest/

Basically, OpenStack heat and Ansible were created to doing different things, HEAT is developed to detect details related to infrastructure and complete provisioning of that infrastructure on OpenStack.

HEAT provides a way to define compute, storage, network, and other infrastructure related resources. This includes the interrelationships between infrastructure resources, such as associating floating IPs with compute resources or binding a compute resource to a specific network. This assigning key pairs for authentication and naming resources.The result of a heat template is a collection of one or more infrastructure resources based on existing images.The software integrates other components of OpenStack. The templates allow the creation of most OpenStack resource types (such as instances, floating IPs, volumes, security groups, users, etc), as well as some more advanced functionality such as for instance high availability, instance autoscaling, and nested stacks. Heat primarily manages infrastructure, but the templates integrate well with software configuration management tools such as Puppet and Ansible.

Ansible is developed to configuring the infrastructure after provisioning, This includes activities like installing libraries and setting up a specific runtime environment.ansible also supports the provisioning.

so we can use both ansible and heat.....both are created for different purposes....

ref: https://software.danielwatrous.com/heat-or-ansible-in-openstack-both/

https://docs.openstack.org/heat/latest/

The Heat Engine now supports only Resource Plugin modules, which allows operators of OpenStack clouds to provide custom Resource handlers to their users.

ref: https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Heat/Plugins