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The installation tutorial uses the LVM backend for Cinder. In this case, each Cinder volume corresponds to a logical volume in an LVM volume group. The volume group resides on one or more physical volumes. The pvcreate command formats a disk as a physical volume. The instructions assume that your block storage node has SCSI disks in addition to the root disk (sdb, sdc, although I think the installation tutorial only uses sdb).

You therefore have to set up your VM with at least one additional disk. It can be a SCSI disk, sdb, or a virtio disk, vdb, or anything else with minor adaptions of the tutorial. Of course, these "disks" are as virtual as the VM and are usually stored on files on the VM host. To the VM, however, they look like hard disks.

An alternative is creating a loop device on the VM and use that as a physical volume, but it's probably easier to just add a disk.

Apart from LVM, you can use other backends. In an experimental environment, NFS or Ceph could be used, for example, but the installation guide is based on LVM.

The installation tutorial uses the LVM backend for Cinder. In this case, each Cinder volume corresponds to a logical volume in an LVM volume group. The volume group resides on one or more physical volumes. The pvcreate command formats a disk as a physical volume. The instructions assume that your block storage node has SCSI disks in addition to the root disk (sdb, sdc, although I think the installation tutorial only uses sdb).

You therefore have to set up your VM with at least one additional disk. It can be a SCSI disk, sdb, or a virtio disk, vdb, or anything else with minor adaptions of the tutorial. Of course, these "disks" are as virtual as the VM and are usually stored on files on the VM host. To the VM, however, they look like hard disks.

An alternative is creating a loop device on the VM and use that as a physical volume, but it's probably easier to just add a disk.

Apart from LVM, you can use other backends. In an experimental environment, NFS NFS, iSCSI or Ceph could be used, for example, but the installation guide is based on LVM.

The installation tutorial uses the LVM backend for Cinder. In this case, each Cinder volume corresponds to a logical volume in an LVM volume group. The volume group resides on one or more physical volumes. The pvcreate command formats a disk as a physical volume. The instructions assume that your block storage node has SCSI disks in addition to the root disk (sdb, sdc, although I think the installation tutorial only uses sdb).

You therefore have to set up your VM with at least one additional disk. It can be a SCSI disk, sdb, or a virtio disk, vdb, or anything else with minor adaptions of the tutorial. Of course, these "disks" are as virtual as the VM and are usually stored on files on the VM host. To the VM, however, they look like hard disks.

An alternative is creating a loop device on the VM and use using that as a physical volume, but it's probably easier to just add a disk.

Apart from LVM, you can use other backends. In an experimental environment, NFS, iSCSI or Ceph could be used, for example, but the installation guide is based on LVM.

The installation tutorial uses the LVM backend for Cinder. In this case, Cinder, where each Cinder volume corresponds to a logical volume volume in an LVM volume group. volume group. The volume group resides on consists of one or more physical volumes. The pvcreate volumes. The pvcreate command formats a disk as a physical volume.

The instructions assume that your block storage node has SCSI disks in addition to the root disk (sdb, sdc, (the diagram on that page mentions sdb and sdc, although I think the installation tutorial only uses sdb).sdb).

You therefore have to set up your VM with at least one additional disk. It can be Here is how you do that with VirtualBox:

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If it's not a SCSI disk, sdb, or a or SATA disk named sdb, your hypervisor may also support virtio disk, vdb, or anything else with minor adaptions of disks named vdb, or other disk types, to which you need to adapt the tutorial. Of course, these "disks" are as virtual as the VM and are usually stored on implemented using files on the VM host. To the VM, however, they look like hard disks.

An As an alternative is creating to disks, you could create a loop device on the VM and using use that as a physical volume, volume (the approach taken by DevStack and Packstack), but it's probably easier to just add a disk.

Apart from LVM, you can use other backends. In an experimental environment, If you don't have fibre-channel disk arrays, Netapp appliances and the like, you could look into experimenting with NFS, iSCSI or Ceph could be used, for example, Ceph, but the installation guide is based on LVM.