Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

The guide tells you what to do on the storage node. You just accept all those disks that are physical volumes or contain partitions used as physical volumes. The guide uses this example:

devices {
...
filter = [ "a/sdb/", "r/.*/"]

The "a" means "accept". The snippet above accepts /dev/sdb, which assumes that /dev/sdb or a partition like /dev/sdb1 is a physical volume. The "r" is needed to reject all other disks. As a result, LVM only considers /dev/sdb. In case the host uses LVM on /dev/sda as well, you also have to accept it.

Configuring lvm.conf in this way is necessary because the host "sees" LVM structures on guests' disks. You want the host's LVM to ignore those. The guests only see their own disks, so that you can leave lvm.conf alone. Especially in a proof-of-concept or learning context.

The guide tells you what to do on the storage node. You just accept all those disks that are with physical volumes or contain partitions used as physical volumes. that belong to the host, and ignore those that don't belong to the host. The guide uses this example:

devices {
...
filter = [ "a/sdb/", "r/.*/"]

The "a" means "accept". The snippet above accepts /dev/sdb, which assumes that /dev/sdb or a partition like /dev/sdb1 is a physical volume. The "r" is needed to reject all other disks. As a result, LVM only considers /dev/sdb. In case the host uses LVM on /dev/sda as well, you also have to accept it.

Configuring lvm.conf in this way is necessary because the host "sees" LVM structures on guests' disks. You want the host's LVM to ignore those. The guests only see their own disks, so that you can leave lvm.conf alone. Especially in a proof-of-concept or learning context.