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Hello,

assuming that you are installing Ubuntu on your bare metal PC, the first thing to do is to configure the only one NIC you have as needed. Note that the NIC will be used for accessing the Operating System (ubuntu), the services (API endpoints), the dashboard (Horizon) and for "exposing" VMs when you associate a floating IP address to them.

Let's make some assumptions for proceeding with the explanation:

1) you want to install Havana with Neutron (not nova-network) 2) your installation is really a single node; i.e. you are not going to add compute nodes in the future

The first thing to do is to configure the network at Operating System level.

You need an OpenVSwitch bridge for several purposes so create that with command:

sudo ovs-vsctl add-br br-ex

Then you need to configure the network at OS level.

The following is an example of how you can configure the network using /etc/network/interfaces:

auto lo iface lo inet loopback

auto eth1 iface eth1 inet manual up ip address add 0/0 dev $IFACE up ip link set $IFACE up up ifconfig $IFACE promisc up ifconfig $IFACE multicast down ip link set $IFACE down

auto br-ex iface br-ex inet static address <static-ip-address> netmask <mask> network <network> broadcast <broadcast> gateway <gateway-ip-address> up ifconfig $IFACE promisc dns-nameservers <dns-ip-address>

The first entry configures the loopback interface: no explanation is needed.

The second entry "starts" the interface whenever you switch on the PC. It's worth noticing that you do not assign any IP address to such an interface and this is needed because this interface will 'capture' all the traffic on the physical network it is connected to. The 'captured' traffic will be forwarded to all the virtual devices connected to the interfaces and one of such devices is br-ex.

The third entry configures br-ex, an OpenVSwitch bridge that will serve for the following purposes:

  • give access to the services (API endpoints) and Horizon
  • give access to the PC's Operating System (ubuntu)
  • give access to VMs in the cloud when they are associated to a floating IP address

After preparing the file in this way, you reboot the PC. It is fundamental to access the PC after the reboot from the console because if you try to access from ethernet you fail. The reason being that you have a single NIC but it is not assigned any IP address.

After accessing through the local console, you should see that you have three interfaces (ifconfig command):

lo Link encap:Local Loopback inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0 inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:65536 Metric:1 RX packets:91931 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:91931 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:19815734 (19.8 MB) TX bytes:19815734 (19.8 MB)

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4b:dd:44:5e inet6 addr: fe80::21a:4bff:fedd:445e/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING PROMISC MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:3370 errors:0 dropped:2 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:427 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:432117 (432.1 KB) TX bytes:60022 (60.0 KB)

br-ex Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4b:dd:44:5e inet addr:10.15.5.92 Bcast:10.15.5.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::9051:56ff:fe8d:568d/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING PROMISC MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:3238 errors:0 dropped:8 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:415 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:383674 (383.6 KB) TX bytes:56880 (56.8 KB)

As you can see, br-ex has the IP address you set (BTW you really need to assign a static IP address, not an IP address via DHCP) but the point is that you can't access the machine through network. In order to do that, you just need to "connect" br-ex to eth1:

sudo ovs-vsctl add-port br-ex eth1

At this point you should be able to access the PC from "outside" using the IP address assigned to br-ex. Please note that the connection survives whenever you reboot the PC.

Now you can start installing OpenStack following this doc http://docs.openstack.org/havana/install-guide/install/apt/content/.

When you install Neutron, you need to know that:

  • when you create the "external network", the floating IP addresses need to be on the same network where br-ex is (e.g. if the node is on 10.15.5.0/24, the floating IP address need to be on 10.15.5.0/24 as well: for example, from 10.15.5.100 to 10.15.5.100).
  • you need to use ml2 Neutron plugin, not openvswitch plugin .

In order to have all the details on how to configure Neutron, you can make an all-in-on devstack installation (maybe on a VM running on VirtualBox and reverse engineer the config files that devstack prepares).

Hope it helps

Hello,

assuming that you are installing Ubuntu on your bare metal PC, the first thing to do is to configure the only one NIC you have as needed. Note that the NIC will be used for accessing the Operating System (ubuntu), the services (API endpoints), the dashboard (Horizon) and for "exposing" VMs when you associate a floating IP address to them.

Let's make some assumptions for proceeding with the explanation:

1) you want to install Havana with Neutron (not nova-network) 2) your installation is really a single node; i.e. you are not going to add compute nodes in the future

The first thing to do is to configure the network at Operating System level.

You need an OpenVSwitch bridge for several purposes so create that with command:

sudo ovs-vsctl add-br br-ex

Then you need to configure the network at OS level.

The following is an example of how you can configure the network using /etc/network/interfaces:

auto lo iface lo inet loopback

auto eth1 iface eth1 inet manual up ip address add 0/0 dev $IFACE up ip link set $IFACE up up ifconfig $IFACE promisc up ifconfig $IFACE multicast down ip link set $IFACE down

auto br-ex iface br-ex inet static address <static-ip-address> netmask <mask> network <network> broadcast <broadcast> gateway <gateway-ip-address> up ifconfig $IFACE promisc dns-nameservers <dns-ip-address>

The first entry configures the loopback interface: no explanation is needed.

The second entry "starts" the interface whenever you switch on the PC. It's worth noticing that you do not assign any IP address to such an interface and this is needed because this interface will 'capture' all the traffic on the physical network it is connected to. The 'captured' traffic will be forwarded to all the virtual devices connected to the interfaces and one of such devices is br-ex.

The third entry configures br-ex, an OpenVSwitch bridge that will serve for the following purposes:

  • give access to the services (API endpoints) and Horizon
  • give access to the PC's Operating System (ubuntu)
  • give access to VMs in the cloud when they are associated to a floating IP address

After preparing the file in this way, you reboot the PC. It is fundamental to access the PC after the reboot from the console because if you try to access from ethernet you fail. The reason being that you have a single NIC but it is not assigned any IP address.

After accessing through the local console, you should see that you have three interfaces (ifconfig command):

lo Link encap:Local Loopback inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0 inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:65536 Metric:1 RX packets:91931 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:91931 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:19815734 (19.8 MB) TX bytes:19815734 (19.8 MB)

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4b:dd:44:5e inet6 addr: fe80::21a:4bff:fedd:445e/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING PROMISC MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:3370 errors:0 dropped:2 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:427 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:432117 (432.1 KB) TX bytes:60022 (60.0 KB)

br-ex Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4b:dd:44:5e inet addr:10.15.5.92 Bcast:10.15.5.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::9051:56ff:fe8d:568d/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING PROMISC MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:3238 errors:0 dropped:8 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:415 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:383674 (383.6 KB) TX bytes:56880 (56.8 KB)

As you can see, br-ex has the IP address you set (BTW you really need to assign a static IP address, not an IP address via DHCP) but the point is that you can't access the machine through network. In order to do that, you just need to "connect" br-ex to eth1:

sudo ovs-vsctl add-port br-ex eth1

At this point you should be able to access the PC from "outside" using the IP address assigned to br-ex. Please note that the connection survives whenever you reboot the PC.

Now you can start installing OpenStack following this doc http://docs.openstack.org/havana/install-guide/install/apt/content/.

When you install Neutron, you need to know that:

  • when you create the "external network", the floating IP addresses need to be on the same network where br-ex is (e.g. if the node is on 10.15.5.0/24, the floating IP address need to be on 10.15.5.0/24 as well: for example, from 10.15.5.100 to 10.15.5.100).
  • you need to use ml2 Neutron plugin, not openvswitch plugin .

In order to have all the details on how to configure Neutron, you can make an all-in-on devstack installation (maybe on a VM running on VirtualBox and reverse engineer the config files that devstack prepares).

Let me also share some info related to OpenStack networking.

To me, it's probably the most complex topic. I strongly recommend this documentation http://docs.openstack.org/grizzly/openstack-network/admin/content/ch_under_the_hood.html for understanding how it is implemented when you use Neutron with OpenVSwitch. The link points to a guide wrote for Grizzly but it is still valid for Havana. It's quite "spicy" contents and, as far as I know, it has not been included in the latest version of documentation. I think it's just a matter of time; the doc team is working pretty well and I'm sure and soon or later they will incorporate these contents in the latest doc.

Hope it helps

Hello,

assuming that you are installing Ubuntu on your bare metal PC, the first thing to do is to configure the only one NIC you have as needed. Note that the NIC will be used for accessing the Operating System (ubuntu), the services (API endpoints), the dashboard (Horizon) and for "exposing" VMs when you associate a floating IP address to them.

Let's make some assumptions for proceeding with the explanation:

1) you want to install Havana with Neutron (not nova-network) 2) your installation is really a single node; i.e. you are not going to add compute nodes in the future

The first thing to do is to configure the network at Operating System level.

You need an OpenVSwitch bridge for several purposes so create that with command:

sudo ovs-vsctl add-br br-ex

Then you need to configure the network at OS level.

The following is an example of how you can configure the network using /etc/network/interfaces:

auto lo iface lo inet loopback

auto eth1 iface eth1 inet manual up ip address add 0/0 dev $IFACE up ip link set $IFACE up up ifconfig $IFACE promisc up ifconfig $IFACE multicast down ip link set $IFACE down

auto br-ex iface br-ex inet static address <static-ip-address> netmask <mask> network <network> broadcast <broadcast> gateway <gateway-ip-address> up ifconfig $IFACE promisc dns-nameservers <dns-ip-address>

The first entry configures the loopback interface: no explanation is needed.

The second entry "starts" the interface whenever you switch on the PC. It's worth noticing that you do not assign any IP address to such an interface and this is needed because this interface will 'capture' all the traffic on the physical network it is connected to. The 'captured' traffic will be forwarded to all the virtual devices connected to the interfaces and one of such devices is br-ex.

The third entry configures br-ex, an OpenVSwitch bridge that will serve for the following purposes:

  • give access to the services (API endpoints) and Horizon
  • give access to the PC's Operating System (ubuntu)
  • give access to VMs in the cloud when they are associated to a floating IP address

After preparing the file in this way, you reboot the PC. It is fundamental to access the PC after the reboot from the console because if you try to access from ethernet you fail. The reason being that you have a single NIC but it is not assigned any IP address.

After accessing through the local console, you should see that you have three interfaces (ifconfig command):

lo Link encap:Local Loopback inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0 inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:65536 Metric:1 RX packets:91931 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:91931 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:19815734 (19.8 MB) TX bytes:19815734 (19.8 MB)

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4b:dd:44:5e inet6 addr: fe80::21a:4bff:fedd:445e/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING PROMISC MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:3370 errors:0 dropped:2 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:427 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:432117 (432.1 KB) TX bytes:60022 (60.0 KB)

br-ex Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4b:dd:44:5e inet addr:10.15.5.92 Bcast:10.15.5.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::9051:56ff:fe8d:568d/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING PROMISC MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:3238 errors:0 dropped:8 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:415 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:383674 (383.6 KB) TX bytes:56880 (56.8 KB)

As you can see, br-ex has the IP address you set (BTW you really need to assign a static IP address, not an IP address via DHCP) but the point is that you can't access the machine through network. In order to do that, you just need to "connect" br-ex to eth1:

sudo ovs-vsctl add-port br-ex eth1

At this point you should be able to access the PC from "outside" using the IP address assigned to br-ex. Please note that the connection survives whenever you reboot the PC.

Now you can start installing OpenStack following this doc http://docs.openstack.org/havana/install-guide/install/apt/content/.

When you install Neutron, you need to know that:

  • when you create the "external network", the floating IP addresses need to be on the same network where br-ex is (e.g. if the node is on 10.15.5.0/24, the floating IP address need to be on 10.15.5.0/24 as well: for example, from 10.15.5.100 to 10.15.5.100).
  • you need to use ml2 Neutron plugin, not openvswitch plugin .

In order to have all the details on how to configure Neutron, you can make an all-in-on devstack installation (maybe on a VM running on VirtualBox and reverse engineer the config files that devstack prepares).

Let me also share some info related to OpenStack networking.

To me, it's probably the most complex topic. I strongly recommend this documentation http://docs.openstack.org/grizzly/openstack-network/admin/content/ch_under_the_hood.html for understanding how it is implemented when you use Neutron with OpenVSwitch. The link points to a guide they wrote for Grizzly but it is still valid for Havana. It's quite "spicy" contents and, as far as I know, it has not been included in the latest version of documentation. I think it's just a matter of time; the doc team is working pretty well and I'm sure and soon or later they will incorporate these contents in the latest doc.

Hope it helps