Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

First my opinion: DevStack is for developers and is not necessarily easy to use. When it works, it's OK. When not, it's hard to troubleshoot. Why do you use Packstack or use the installation tutorials to set up your OpenStack cloud?

DevStack documentation is at https://docs.openstack.org/developer/devstack. Using DevStack with Neutron.

You only need one network interface for DevStack. In this case, DevStack simulates the "external" network, which is not external at all. If you want your external network to be mapped to an existing network, for example the host-only network that your eth1 is connected to, just add PUBLIC_INTERFACE=eth1 to your local.conf as documented.

How on earth did you end up with an IP address of 0.0.0.1. (with a dot after the last digit!) and a netmask of 0.0.0.0? This is unusable. Or a typo. Or several typos. Or all of the above. Your loopback device doesn't look healthy, either.

Is 174.... the floating or static IP of the instance? Indeed, DevStack normally uses 10.0.0.0/24 for static IPs. You can change defaults for static and floating IP addresses with the FIXED_RANGE and FLOATING_RANGE variables. I don't know where 174 comes from.

First my opinion: DevStack is for developers and is not necessarily easy to use. When it works, it's OK. When not, it's hard to troubleshoot. Why do don't you use Packstack or use the installation tutorials to the training lab, or set up your OpenStack cloud?cloud according to the installation manuals?

DevStack documentation is at https://docs.openstack.org/developer/devstack. Using DevStack with Neutron.

You only need one network interface for DevStack. In this case, DevStack simulates the "external" network, which is not external at all. If you want your external network to be mapped to an existing network, for example the host-only network that your eth1 is connected to, just add PUBLIC_INTERFACE=eth1 to your local.conf as documented.

How on earth did you end up with an IP address of 0.0.0.1. (with a dot after the last digit!) and a netmask of 0.0.0.0? This is unusable. Or a typo. Or several typos. Or all of the above. Your loopback device doesn't look healthy, either.

Is 174.... the floating or static IP of the instance? Indeed, DevStack normally uses 10.0.0.0/24 for static IPs. You can change defaults for static and floating IP addresses with the FIXED_RANGE and FLOATING_RANGE variables. I don't know where 174 comes from.

First my opinion: DevStack is for developers and is not necessarily easy to use. When it works, it's OK. When not, it's hard to troubleshoot. Why don't you use Packstack or the training lab, or set up your OpenStack cloud according to the installation manuals?

DevStack documentation is at https://docs.openstack.org/developer/devstack. Particularly, Using DevStack with Neutron.

You only need one network interface for DevStack. In this case, DevStack simulates the "external" network, which is not external at all. If you want your external network to be mapped to an existing network, for example the host-only network that your eth1 is connected to, just add PUBLIC_INTERFACE=eth1 to your local.conf as documented.

How on earth did you end up with an IP address of 0.0.0.1. (with a dot after the last digit!) and a netmask of 0.0.0.0? This is unusable. Or a typo. Or several typos. Or all of the above. Your loopback device doesn't look healthy, either.

Is 174.... the floating or static IP of the instance? Indeed, DevStack normally uses 10.0.0.0/24 for static IPs. You can change defaults for static and floating IP addresses with the FIXED_RANGE and FLOATING_RANGE variables. I don't know where 174 comes from.