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The installation tutorial uses Linuxbridge, not OVS. If you want the OVS configuration, read the Networking Guide.

For self-service networking, the installation tutorial expects two networks, a provider network that connects instances to the outside world, and a management network that is used for everything else, such as internal messaging using RabbitMQ, public and internal access to APIs, and for virtual networks (the tutorial uses VXLAN to create virtual networks on top of the management network).

Thus, your network configuration is not quite as expected by the tutorial. It's not clear what your interfaces are connected to; I assume for now that eth0 is used for internal API, message queue traffic and virtual networks; eth0:1 is used for external API; eth1 accesses the provider network.

On the controller configuration page, the lines that map your OpenStack configuration to your physical network are

physical_interface_mappings = provider:PROVIDER_INTERFACE_NAME

and

local_ip = OVERLAY_INTERFACE_IP_ADDRESS

The first line tells Neutron which interface connects the host to the provider network. Under my assumption, this is eth1. The second line is the IP address of the management network interface; eth0 if I assume correctly.

The installation tutorial uses Linuxbridge, not OVS. If you want the OVS configuration, read the Networking Guide.

For self-service networking, the installation tutorial expects two networks, a provider network that connects instances to the outside world, and a management network that is used for everything else, such as internal messaging using RabbitMQ, public and internal access to APIs, and for virtual networks (the tutorial uses VXLAN to create virtual networks on top of the management network).

Thus, your network configuration is not quite as expected by the tutorial. It's not clear what your interfaces are connected to; I assume for now that eth0 is used for internal API, message queue traffic and virtual networks; eth0:1 is used for external API; eth1 accesses the provider network.

On the controller configuration page, the lines that map your OpenStack configuration to your physical network are

physical_interface_mappings = provider:PROVIDER_INTERFACE_NAME

and

local_ip = OVERLAY_INTERFACE_IP_ADDRESS

The first line tells Neutron which interface connects the host to the provider network. Under my assumption, this is eth1. The second line is the IP address of the management network interface; eth0 if I assume correctly.

By the way, Mitaka is two cycles back. Ocata is the current release. Why Mitaka?

The installation tutorial uses Linuxbridge, not OVS. If you want the OVS configuration, read the Networking Guide.

For self-service networking, the installation tutorial expects two networks, a provider network that connects instances to the outside world, and a management network that is used for everything else, such as internal messaging using RabbitMQ, public and internal access to APIs, and for virtual networks (the tutorial uses VXLAN to create virtual networks on top of the management network).

Thus, your network configuration is not quite as expected by the tutorial. It's not clear what your interfaces are connected to; I assume for now that eth0 is used for internal API, message queue traffic and virtual networks; eth0:1 is used for external API; eth1 accesses the provider network.

On the controller configuration page, the lines that map your OpenStack configuration to your physical network are

physical_interface_mappings = provider:PROVIDER_INTERFACE_NAME

and

local_ip = OVERLAY_INTERFACE_IP_ADDRESS

The first line tells Neutron which interface connects the host to the provider network. Under my assumption, this is eth1. The second line is the IP address of the management network interface; eth0 if I assume correctly.correctly. The compute host configuration is analogous.

By the way, Mitaka is two cycles back. Ocata is the current release. Why Mitaka?

The installation tutorial uses Linuxbridge, not OVS. If you want the OVS configuration, read the Networking Guide.

For self-service networking, the installation tutorial expects two networks, a provider network that connects instances to the outside world, and a management network that is used for everything else, such as internal messaging using RabbitMQ, public and internal access to APIs, and for virtual networks (the tutorial uses VXLAN to create virtual networks on top of the management network).

Thus, your network configuration is not quite as expected by the tutorial. It's not clear what your interfaces are connected to; I assume for now that eth0 is used for internal API, message queue traffic and virtual networks; eth0:1 is used for external API; eth1 accesses the provider network.

On the controller configuration page, the lines that map your OpenStack configuration to your physical network are

physical_interface_mappings = provider:PROVIDER_INTERFACE_NAME

and

local_ip = OVERLAY_INTERFACE_IP_ADDRESS

The first line tells Neutron which interface connects the host to the provider network. Under my assumption, this is eth1. The second line is the IP address of the management network interface; eth0 if I assume correctly. The compute host configuration is analogous.

By the way, Mitaka is two cycles back. Ocata is the current release. Why Mitaka?

EDIT:

Just to rule out stupid mistakes, I hope you use different IP addresses on the two nodes for the local_ip parameter:

local_ip = 10.0.0.2

How to troubleshoot this: If you use the default central router, the floating IP is implemented in the router's namespace on the controller. Ping the floating IP, and use tcpdump to trace the traffic at several places, and see where the traffic disappears. Unfortunately I don't know how Linuxbridge traffic is routed. It's something I have wanted to find out, but haven't taken the time to do so far.

You can use the network troubleshooting guide in the operations manual. It assumes OVS, but it should be good inspiration. I guess Linuxbridge is actually easier. Also use the Components and Connectivity diagram in the networking guide.

The installation tutorial uses Linuxbridge, not OVS. If you want the OVS configuration, read the Networking Guide.

For self-service networking, the installation tutorial expects two networks, a provider network that connects instances to the outside world, and a management network that is used for everything else, such as internal messaging using RabbitMQ, public and internal access to APIs, and for virtual networks (the tutorial uses VXLAN to create virtual networks on top of the management network).

Thus, your network configuration is not quite as expected by the tutorial. It's not clear what your interfaces are connected to; I assume for now that eth0 is used for internal API, message queue traffic and virtual networks; eth0:1 is used for external API; eth1 accesses the provider network.

On the controller configuration page, the lines that map your OpenStack configuration to your physical network are

physical_interface_mappings = provider:PROVIDER_INTERFACE_NAME

and

local_ip = OVERLAY_INTERFACE_IP_ADDRESS

The first line tells Neutron which interface connects the host to the provider network. Under my assumption, this is eth1. The second line is the IP address of the management network interface; eth0 if I assume correctly. The compute host configuration is analogous.

By the way, Mitaka is two cycles back. Ocata is the current release. Why Mitaka?

EDIT:

Just to rule out stupid mistakes, I hope you use different IP addresses on the two nodes for the local_ip parameter:

local_ip = 10.0.0.2

How to troubleshoot this: If you use the default central router, the floating IP is implemented in the router's namespace on the controller. Ping the floating IP, and use tcpdump to trace the traffic at several places, and see where the traffic disappears. Unfortunately I don't know how Linuxbridge traffic is routed. It's something I have wanted to find out, but haven't taken the time to do so far.

You can use the network troubleshooting guide guide in the operations manual. It assumes OVS, but it should be good inspiration. I guess Linuxbridge is actually easier. Also use the Components and Connectivity diagram in the networking guide.