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OVS is simply not a router. It lacks L3 interfaces and IP protocols.

You'll need a VM instance (or logical interfaces on the local Linux stack) to act as your vRouter. There are many free/open-source and commercial options for this function, but perhaps the easiest (yet feature-poor) option is to eliminate OVS completely and just use native Linux Bridging, which allows you to add IP numbering to your bridge interfaces.

Here is a VERY simple example in Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS:

auto br0 iface br0 inet static bridge_ports em1 bridge_stp off bridge_fd 0 bridge_maxwait 0 address 192.168.1.200 netmask 255.255.255.0 gateway 192.168.1.1 dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1 up /sbin/ifconfig $IFACE up || /bin/true

You can add multiple physical interfaces to this same bridge, but based on your description you likely want two separate bridge interfaces, each associated with a different physical interface, each with its own IP address.

Routing is a larger conversation. Note that you'll only want ONE bridge with a default route, normally. Hosts/VMs on either side will need to know the route to the other side/subnet via static routes, or perhaps their def.gwy host will handle that static route for them. Again, this is a larger/different conversation.

OVS is simply not a router. It lacks L3 interfaces and IP protocols.

You'll need a VM instance (or logical interfaces on the local Linux stack) to act as your vRouter. There are many free/open-source and commercial options for this function, but perhaps the easiest (yet feature-poor) option is to eliminate OVS completely and just use native Linux Bridging, which allows you to add IP numbering to your bridge interfaces.

Here is a VERY simple example in Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS:

auto br0
iface br0 inet static
        bridge_ports em1
        bridge_stp off
        bridge_fd 0
        bridge_maxwait 0
        address 192.168.1.200
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        gateway 192.168.1.1
        dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
        up /sbin/ifconfig $IFACE up || /bin/true

/bin/true

You can add multiple physical interfaces to this same bridge, but based on your description you likely want two separate bridge interfaces, each associated with a different physical interface, each with its own IP address.

Routing is a larger conversation. Note that you'll only want ONE bridge with a default route, normally. Hosts/VMs on either side will need to know the route to the other side/subnet via static routes, or perhaps their def.gwy host will handle that static route for them. Again, this is a larger/different conversation.